Search Results for: Wicked

Tame and Wicked Problems

Reiner Grundmann has a new paper on The rightful placeful of expertise. It’s rather long, but there were a couple of things I wanted to highlight, and it gives me chance to try and stress something I was trying to … Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, ClimateBall, Global warming, Policy, Scientists, The scientific method | Tagged , , , , , | 88 Comments

Being wicked

There’s been an interesting discussion on Twitter about how to frame anthropogenically-driven climate change. In particular, should it be framed as a wicked problem? A number of people involved in the discussion had a problem with this framing. One very … Continue reading

Posted in advocacy, Climate change, economics, Policy, Politics | Tagged , , , | 67 Comments

Depolarising the debate?

I’ve always been a little puzzled by the (mostly) social scientists who seem to argue that to develop effective climate policy we should stop using labels, be depolarizing the debate, and should prioritise civil disagreements. It’s not that I object … Continue reading

Posted in advocacy, Climate change, Environmental change, Policy, Science | Tagged , , , , | 118 Comments

It’s dangerous!

There’s a recent Nature Climate Change article by Shinichiro Asayam, Rob Bellamy, Oliver Geden, Warren Pearce and Mike Hulme. It’s called Why setting a climate deadline is dangerous. The basic idea is that the rise in political rhetoric that sets … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 126 Comments

J R Oppenheimer Asks: Can Science Provide Better Models for Democracy?

I came across a collection of 1950’s vintage essays by Robert Oppenheimer that’s been lurking quietly unattended in my book collection for who knows how long. Reading essays by scientifically accomplished people from long ago is always an eye-opener. Bits … Continue reading

Posted in physicists, Policy, Politics, Uncategorized | 50 Comments

Social science

On a number of occasions I’ve seen suggestions that those who want to communicate the seriousness of climate change, should aim to understand the social sciences and should listen more to social scientists. I’m well aware that there’s much about … Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Research, Scientists | Tagged , , , , , | 48 Comments

Common ground?

Judith Curry testified before the US House of Representatives. You can read her evidence and post. In a follow up post Judith suggests that there is some common ground that we can build on. I’m not really convinced that there … Continue reading

Posted in Carbon tax, Climate change, ClimateBall, GRRRROWTH, Policy | Tagged , , , , | 243 Comments

2018: A year in review

Well, it’s the end of another year, so I should probably do a round-up of what’s happened on the blog. The blog seems to be ticking along quite well, but I still don’t really know what I’m doing; I just … Continue reading

Posted in Climate sensitivity, ClimateBall, Environmental change, Personal | Tagged , , , | 11 Comments

Five dimensions of climate science reductionism

Since I’ve been writing about social science papers recently, there are a couple of others I wanted to mention. I discovered that James has already covered one, so I don’t need to say more. The other is a paper called … Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, ClimateBall, The philosophy of science, The scientific method | Tagged , , , , | 36 Comments

Dialog On Nature

Reficcug 0.2 released the ACTUAL transcript of the Chatham ruled negotiations between the Hartwell Brokering Ship (HBS) and a Throng of Tepid Physicists (TTP). HBS: You created a conceptual mess – please leave the AGW problem to us. TTP: Recommend you stop excluding practitioners of … Continue reading

Posted in ClimateBall, Satire | 95 Comments