Search Results for: methane

Halting the vast release of methane is critical

A week or so ago there was a New York Times article called Halting the Vast Release of Methane Is Critical for Climate, U.N. Says. As the title suggests, it was reporting on a United Nations Report that (according to … Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Environmental change, Global warming, Policy, Science | Tagged , , , , , | 43 Comments

Understanding methane

There was a recent Conversation article about methane called Climate explained: methane is short-lived in the atmosphere but leaves long-term damage that caused a bit of a stir on Twitter. One way people assess the significance of different greenhouse gases, … Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Global warming, Policy, Research, The scientific method | Tagged , , , , , , , | 41 Comments

Methane

I’ve always been a little confused as to why so much attention is paid to methane emissions. It’s short-lived, so isn’t it maybe somewhat less important that CO2 emissions, which are long-lived? One reason it is quite prominent is because … Continue reading

Posted in Environmental change, Global warming, Policy, Research, Scientists | Tagged , , , , , | 242 Comments

Methane and things

Given that the whole Royal Society Twitter saga relates partly to the possibility of an abrupt methane release, I thought I might post this video that I found on Climate Denial Crock of the Week (I hope Peter Sinclair doesn’t … Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Climate sensitivity, Global warming, Science | Tagged , , , , | 30 Comments

Plausible emission scenarios

A paper by Roger Pielke Jr, Matthew Burgess and Justin Ritchie has been submitted that suggests that the most plausible 2005-2040 emission scenarios project less than 2.5oC of warming by 2100. It’s generated a bit of debate on social media, … Continue reading

Posted in ClimateBall, Global warming, Policy, Roger Pielke Jr | Tagged , , , , , | 55 Comments

Agricultural emissions

There’s a really nice recent paper by John Lynch, Michelle Cain, David Frame and Ray Pierrehumbert on Agriculture’s Contribution to Climate Change and Role in Mitigation Is Distinct From Predominantly Fossil CO2-Emitting Sectors. It’s largely discussing why there are important … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 179 Comments

2020: A year in review

It’s been quite a year. The blog certainly hasn’t been as active as it has been in previous years. This is partly because it is simply getting more and more difficult to motivate myself to write posts, but is also … Continue reading

Posted in ClimateBall, ClimateBall Bingo, Philosophy for Bloggers | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

Deep Adaptation

Something I haven’t paid much attention to recently is the Deep Adaptation arguments. I think it originated with a paper by Jem Bendell. The reason it’s of current interest is because of a critique called the faulty science, doomism, and … Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, ClimateBall, Philosophy for Bloggers, Policy | Tagged , , , , | 56 Comments

feedbacks, runaway, and tipping points

There’s been some discussion on Twitter about feedbacks, runaways, and tipping points. The issue is that some seem to confuse these and sometimes imply that we could cross thresholds where we’ll undergo a runaway. I thought I would briefly try … Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Climate sensitivity, Global warming, Severe Events, The scientific method, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 214 Comments

2019: A year in review

The end of another year, so time to do another round-up of this year’s posts. My main impression of 2019, unfortunatey, is that the climate debate is moved from disagreements with people who either deny climate change or the need … Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Personal, Scientists, The philosophy of science | Tagged , , , | 27 Comments